Page 70 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 35

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60
JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
of Jewish historiography in the 19th century. I t should be added
tha t
Qun tre s im
are published jointly with the Faculty of His­
tory at the Hebrew University.
4.
M E Q O R O T
(Source S tudies). These are selected sources
annotated and discussed. Examples are:
“A C omm en ta ry on Se­
lec ted In sc r ip tion s from the P e r io d of the M o n a r c h y “B a b y ­
lon ian Jew ry and its In s t i tu tio n s in the P e r io d of the T a lm u d
and
“T h e Beg inn ings of the H aska lah in Russia
M erkaz Shazar
has entered into a close partnership with the
Historical Society of Israel, whose publications it distributes.
These include the learned quarterly “Zion,” which is now in its
41st year. The Society and the
M erka z
now share the same
address.
As for reaching out to the wider public, the Center has
chosen to direct its efforts primarily to the teachers of history
in secondary schools, and to their students. In cooperation with
the Department of Education and Culture, teams have been
sent and seminars have been held in many parts of the country,
some of them often considered remote. In recent months the
Center has begun to publish
Siah ,
in which historical themes
are presented and methods of teaching them discussed. This
aspect of the work is taken very serioulsy, and will undoubtedly
be expanded when budget allows. The same applies to a number
of other projects still in their infancy—such as a gallery of
national portraiture, and an archive of travelling historical
exhibits.
YAD H A R A V H E R ZO G
A very different scene now confronts us. Pure research in classic
Talmudic literature sums up the chosen task of this institute,
whose official title in English is “The Rabbi Herzog World
Academy.” If one adds that its major projects are of a very
long-term nature, the definition wlil be reasonably complete.
T he great undertaking of the Academy is a scientific edition
of the entire text of the Babylonian Talmud , complete with all
the variant readings. T he recent appearance of the first tractate
to be finished—Ketubot, in two volumes—caused the great T a l­
mudist Professor Saul Lieberman to exclaim tha t the whole
enterprise is “a work of gigantic dimensions.” He said it would