Page 125 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 36

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OFFENBACHER / THE JEW ISH STUDIES M ICROFICHE PRO JECT
T he same scholarly team of Urbach and Rosenthal is re-
sponsible for an excellent selection of Jubilee and Memorial
Volumes as well as Collected Papers—those elusive publications
so often cited bu t difficult to find. I t includes the
Gesammelte
Schriften
of D. Kaufmann and L. Loew. M. Steinschneider’s
Gesammelte Schriften
are included under “Mediaeval Philo-
sopliy,” selected by Prof. S. Pines of the Hebrew University.
I t appears together with a representative choice of out-of-print
discourses on Jewish mediaeval philosophers and their teach-
ings, written around the turn of the century.
LANGUAGES AND L IT E R A T U R E
The catalogue of “Languages and L iterature” opens with
a select bu t highly useful list of works on “Hebrew and other
Semitic Linguistics” by Prof. H. Rabin of the Hebrew Univer-
sity. Here, for instance, is offered not only Fuenn’s
Ha-Ozar,
a lexicon of Biblical and Mishnaic Hebrew (1912-1913), but
also
Die Hebraeerin am Putztische
by Hartmann (1809-1810),
described by Prof. Rabin as a “bibliographical rarissimum” and
“an inexhaustible source of information for the exegete.”
Another rarity is
Beluy Kidan, Haddis Kidan,
the beautifully
printed Ethiopian Bible produced in 1934 bu t long out-of-print.
Last not least, two important serials are listed, namely:
Ameri-
can Journal of Semitic Languages
(formerly
Hebraica
) with
almost all of its 42 volumes, and
Zeitschrift fuer die alttesta-
mentliche Wissenschaft,
1881-1910, with an index.
For “Mediaeval Hebrew L itera ture” H. Schirmann, Professor
Emeritus of the Hebrew University, made a selection from his
own well-known bibliography on the subject. Although con-
cerned for the most part with publications on literature, his list
includes also such works as Abulafia’s
Gan ha-Meshalim ve-ha-
H ido t
in Yellin’s edition (1932-1937). On the other hand,
Dr. Patterson included in his selection of “Modern Hebrew
Litera ture” chiefly the literary works themselves. In his introduc-
tion to the catalogue he explains tha t he concentrated on the
literature of the period of 1789-1914 which “reflects a serious
attempt to encourage and enable European Jewry to come to
terms with European culture” and sheds “considerable light
on Jewish social and economic conditions.”