Page 126 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 36

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JEW ISH BOOK ANNUAL
1 1 8
A basically different approach distinguishes “Yiddish Books”
from the rest. I t was the idea of Prof. C. Shmeruk, of the
Hebrew University, to make available a corpus of all the Yid-
dish books published up to 1750. Thanks mainly to the unique
Oppenheim collection at the Bodleian Library, practically all
the Yiddish books prin ted up to 1650 are now available to the
scholarly world, while a second list of later works has already
been prepared. As pointed out by Prof. Shmeruk, “Yiddish books
have never enjoyed the veneration given by Jewish society to
books in Hebrew.” Consequently, many Yiddish books and
pamphlets have been lost, while others have been preserved
only in single copies.
PALEST INE AND ISRAEL
In the framework of IDC’s Project, “Jewish History” starts with
“Palestine, 16th-19th Centuries,” when the Jews were under
Ottoman rule. T he list, compiled by Dr. Y. Barnai, of the He-
brew University, can almost be viewed as a selected bibliography
on the theme. Dr. Barnai has clearly divided his subject into
monographs, documents and articles arranged according to cen-
turies. Among the first group, an item like Schwarz's
Tevu ’ot
ha-Arez
(1845), notable for its description of Palestine’s geog-
raphy as seen at the beginning of the 19th century, can be
found. For the listing of documents, the volumes of
Yerushala-
yim
have been carefully combed. Selected articles were drawn
from different issues of such well-known periodicals as
Ha-
Levanon, Ha-Maggid
or
Havazzelet.
The bibliographical importance of the catalogue on “Zionism
and Palestine 1897-1948” is of great value. Dr. E. Friesel, of
the Ben-Gurion University and the Hebrew University, has
made a comprehensive selection which covers virtually all the
basic sources needed for research on the subject. Among these
are: All the important Command Papers of the British Man-
datory Government; the Minutes of all the Zionist Congresses
up to 1951, including the Reports submitted to them and never
before published as a whole; representative serials of the Zion-
ist press in Hebrew and Yiddish and in European languages;
Zionist literature which includes, for the first time, a complete
edition of Herzl’s letters and his dispatches from Paris; and