Page 139 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 36

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131
WIENER / JEW ISH LITERARY ANNIVERSARIES
Jewish communities and also to work toward the improvement
of the legal status of his coreligionists. He published a transla׳
tion of the Pentateuch into German in Hebrew characters with
an accompanying Hebrew commentary, which did not differ
much from the traditional ones, but the translation was intended
to introduce German Jews to German culture.
J
oseph
O
patoshu
.
25th anniversary of death. Born in Poland in
1886, died in New York, October 8, 1954. In the United States
since 1907, he was a writer of Yiddish novels and short stories,
many of which appeared in the Yiddish daily,
Der Tog.
He was
among the first to include the American Jewish experience among
his themes. But he also utilized the wider sweep of Jewish his-
tory as a canvas for his works. In English translation there ap-
peared
In Polish Woods
(first published in 1938), which dealt
with the decline of the Hasidic movement in the early 19th cen-
tury.
A Day in Regensburg
(1968) has 16th-century Germany as
its background.
The Last Revolt
(1952) has as its setting the
Bar Kochba Revolt.
E
liezer
R
ieger
.
25th anniversary of birth. Born in Gribov, Galicia,
in 1896, died in Jerusalem, April 19, 1954. After studying in
Vienna, he settled in Palestine in 1920 as a teacher and school
principal, finally establishing an experimental school. Upon the
establishment of the State of Israel, he became director-general
of the Ministry of Education. Before that he had served as profes-
sor of education at the Hebrew University. He prepared Hebrew
text books in Jewish and general history, a Hebrew frequency
word list, and a 2-volume work on education in Palestine.
M
ichael
L
evi
R
odkinson
.
75th anniversary of death. Born in Dub-
rovno, Russia, in 1845, died in New York, January 6, 1904. After
editing some Hebrew and Yiddish journals in Koenigsberg in the
1870s, and attracting to them noted Haskalah writers, such as
Lilienblum and Judah Loeb Gordon, he eventually came to the
United States. He is best remembered here for an English transla-
tion of part of the Talmud, which, however, was not well received.
F
ranz
R
osenzweig
.
50th anniversary of death. Born in Kassel, Ger-
many, in 1886, died in Frankfurt a. M. December 10, 1929. Coming
from an assimilated Jewish family and trained in philosophy,
he was ready at one point to convert to Christianity, but attendance
at a High Holy Day Service in Berlin transformed him into
a committed Jew. Settling in Berlin before World War I, he
came under the influence of Hermann Cohen and Martin Buber.
During the war he wrote his main theological work, which more
recently was translated as
The Star of Redemption
(1971). In it