Page 55 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 38

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KABAKOFF / THE AMERICAN HAMEASSEF
45
was originally de livered as a lecture be fo re the Society. T h e article
points out the d ifferences between the biblical and post-biblical
usages o f these terms. Sarasohn was born in Paiser, Suwalki
province. Like Jalomstein, he came to Am erica during the 1860’s
and returned to Europe, finally settling here in 1871. H e was to
become one o f the most successful publishers o f Yiddish newspa­
pers in America. A lready in 1872 he published the
New Yorker
Yidishe Tsaytung,
which lasted fo r six months. H e launched his
Yidishe Gazetn
in 1874 and during the 1880’s started a Y iddish
daily newspaper, the
Teglikhe Gazetn,
which was the first o f its kind
anywhere and which lasted fo r six months. Sarasohn’s ambition to
establish a daily was fully realized with the launching in 1885 o f
Yidishes Tageblatt,
which lasted over fou r decades. H e was also
instrumental in starting the publication o f the Hebrew weekly
H a ’ivri
(1892), which was edited by Gerson Rosenzweig, the noted
satirist and epigrammatist. T h e frontispiece o f
Hameassef
ind i­
cates that the periodical was printed at the press o f K .H . Sara­
sohn, book and job printer, 21 A llen Street. Sarasohn was active in
the O rthodox Jewish community fo r many years and was a lead­
ing figu re in imm igrant affairs. A t his funeral he was eu logized by
Jacob H. Sch iff and Rabbi Jacob David Willowski (R idvaz).
O TH E R C O N T R IB U T IO N S
Moses Aaron Schreiber (1841-1912), who served as a cantor,
teacher and mohel in N ew York and later in Baltimore, made a
number o f contributions to
Hameassef.
Born in Kovno, Russia, he
was taught privately by Abraham Mapu and others. His patrio­
tism was early evident in the poem
Minhat Yehudah
(Judah’s O f f e r ­
ing), which he composed on the occasion o f the centennial o f
American independence in 1876. As a found ing member o f the
Society, he was invited to deliver an original prayer at the open ing
meeting and its text is included in
Hameassef.
In flowery style he
expressed the loyalty o f the members to the Hebrew language
and to the new land o f their adoption. Schreiber made two other
contributions to
Hameassef,
a poem which he described as a free
translation from the English and an explication o f the Hebrew
term “ Shemesh,” which had originally been presented at a meet­
ing o f the Society.
T h e most valuable contribution to
Hameassef
is that o f Judah
David Eisenstein (1854-1956), entitled “ T h e Opposition o f the