Page 79 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 4

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KABAKOF F ----AMONG RECENT HEBREW BOOKS
67
has learned the speech and folklore of the Yemenite Jews. He has
already written many stories of Yemenite life under the pen-name
of Zechariah Uzzali. His present novel, couched in a unique style,
takes us through three generations of Yemenite Jews in Palestine,
from the younger generation that is trying to integrate itself into
the new life of the country to the members of the older generation
who persist in their customs and beliefs.
Our survey of necessity has had to deal only with Hebrew
creativity in this country and with some of the works produced
by the Palestine literary center because the European continent
can no longer feed the stream of Hebrew literary creativity. Both
we in this country and the Jews of Palestine shall have to spend
many years before we can even reproduce in new editions the
classic Jewish works which the European Jewish centers so plen-
tifully supplied.
HEBREW LITERATURE IN ENGLAND
I t is encouraging to record, however, that a significant Hebrew
literary undertaking has been begun in England, largely because
of the enthusiasm and perserverance of Dr. Simon Rawidowicz.
He has begun the publication of periodic collections of essays and
studies under the name of
Metsudah
(Fortress). Represented in
the second
Metsudah
volume, published last year by the Arrarat
publishing society, are such scholars as Samuel Kraus, Abraham
Marmorstein, Cecil Roth, Isidore Epstein, Leon Simon and others.
The volume also contains contributions in Hebrew by two non-
Jewish scholars — James Parkes, who defends British Jews against
anti-Semitic charges, and Frederick F. Bruce, who contributes a
review on a biblical theme. Considering the limited means at his
disposal, the editor has achieved remarkable results. The volume
includes a section of articles on Israel in the World, Studies, Es-
says, Surveys (including two of American Jewry by Dr. B. Wein-
ryb and Dr. A. Tartakower), Comments and Reviews and In
Memoriam.
These publication endeavors are a remarkable indication of the
vitality of Hebrew letters and hold forth the promise for their
future unhampered development wherever large Jewish commu-
nities exist.