Page 229 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 41

Basic HTML Version

REED /AMERICAN JEW ISH FICTION BOOKS
223
K
l e i n
, E
l i z a b e t h
.
Reconciliations.
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1982. 364
P-
Heavyhanded proselytizing grounded in a gloomy domestic tale.
An assimilated ManhattanJewish family survives a trauma and gains
a new perspective stemming from Jewish roots and orthodoxy.
K
o n r a d
, G
e o r g e
.
The loser.
Trans, by Ivan Sanders. New York,
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1982. 300 p.
A patient in a mental hospital recalls his life as a Jewish
intellectual, army officer and state minister during Hungary’s 1956
turmoil.
L
e v i n
, S
h e i l a
.
Simple truths.
New York, Crown, 1982. 288 p.
The daughter of Holocaust survivors narrates this novel. Susan, a
divorcee in her thirties, comes to terms with her Jewish heritage and
overcomes the burdens of her past through her commitment to
working with Soviet Jewry.
L
in n
, M
e r r i t t
.
A book of songs.
New
Y o rk , St. M a r t in ’s,
1983. 309 p.
A young boy survives a concentration camp by begging for food
and playing haunting melodies on his violin. His presence in the
camp raises many troubling issues for the inmates. Compelling
images of concentration camp survival.
M
a c h l is
, JOSEPH.
Lisa’s boy.
New York, Norton, 1982. 416
p.
David, the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, displays unusual
musical talent at a young age. The reader follows his passage
through childhood, adolescence and into adulthood, when he real­
izes that he will never reach his goal to be a concert pianist.
M
a r c u s
, J
e r r y
.
Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, andZev.
Chicago, Brittany, 1982.
225 p.
A story of a yeshiva student’s personal and philosophical develop­
ment and an examination of anti-Semitism.
M
a s t e r t o n
, G
r a h a m
.
Solitaire.
New York, Morrow, 1982. 568
p.
Barney Blitz leaves mid-19th century Lower East Side and follows
his brother to South Africa, where he intends to amass enough
wealth to overcome the stigma of being Jewish. Engrossing picture
of South Africa in the late 19th century.
PROSE, F
r a n c in e
.
Hungry hearts.
New York, Pantheon, 1983. 213
p.
A dybbuk stalks the cast of the Yiddish Art Theater in 1921, by
invading the queen of the Yiddish theater, Dinah Rappoport. When
she is forced to hide her marriage to the leading man in a production
of “The Dybbuk,” a real dybbuk takes revenge.
Q u inn e ll , A.
J .
The snap.
New York, Morrow, 1983. 256
p.
A spy thriller about aJewish photographer who becomes involved
in an Israeli plan to vindicate its air raid on an Iraqi nuclear plant
and discourage the withdrawal of U.S. political and moral support.