Page 177 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 42

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FABER /REC ENT WORKS ON JEWISH LAW
1 6 9
published in Hebrew in the past decade. Some appeared in
English, either in excerpted translation from the original
Hebrew, or in the form o f research on a given problem for prag­
matic ends. The following work is a typical illustration:
Law and
Theology in Judaism
(New York, Ktav, 1947; second series, 1976),
by David Novak. Both volumes contain collections o f studies,
carefully annotated with references to talmudic and halakhic
sources as well as philosophic writings, on problems in contempo­
rary Jewish life resulting from challenges o f “modernism,” e.g.
status o f women, abortion, euthanasia, rationale for kashruth.
The author’s discussions o f theology are o f special interest due to
the fact that he espouses the school o f thought going back to
Zacharias Frankel (1801-1875).
J. David Bleich attempts in
Contemporary Halakhic Problems
(New York, Ktav, 1977 — one o f the titles in the publisher’s
series, “Library o f Jewish Law and Ethics”) to apply criteria o f
Jewish law to social, political and technological problems o f the
day. The author’s philosophic position in this work is strictly
Orthodox, rarely allowing for leniency or modification o f
Halakhah. This conformist stand is reflected in the author’s
other works as well.
MED ICAL ISSUES
In the field o f medicine and biochemistry, the Hebrew
responsa o f Y. E. Waldenberg, author o f the multi-volumed
“Tzitz Eliezer,” are o f unique interest. David B. Simens edited
and Abraham Steinberg translated into English the respective
materials in
Jewish Medical Law, compiled and editedfrom the
“Tzitz
Eliezer”
(Jerusalem, Gefen, 1980). Note should be taken o f
Prac­
tical Medical Halacha
(\^JewYork, Feldheim, 1980) by Fred Rosner
and Moses D. Tendler. Moshe Halevi Spero’s
Judaism and Psychol­
ogy: Halakhic Perspectives
(New York, Ktav, 1980), the only work
so far that focuses attention on aspects o f psychology, is another
title in the publisher’s series, “Library o f Jewish Law and Ethics.”
Alex J. Goldman follows an eclectic methodology in
Judaism
Confronts Contemporary Issues
(New York, Shengold, 1978), in
which he discusses thirteen themes in alphabetical order — from
“Abortion” to “Suicide.” Opinions on the respective subjects are
cited systematically from the Bible, Talmud, medieval sources
and modern philosophy. This volume is more useful as an histor­