Page 17 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 43

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KABAKOFF / INTRODUCTION
5
contributions of our writers range over the entire field of Jewish
literary expression, from the Bible down to contemporary letters.
We are grateful to our contributors for sharing their knowledge
and expertise with us.
We are again indebted to our bibliographers for their listings
of the year’s literary output in America, England and Israel. The
bibliographies of English, Hebrew and Yiddish books cover
broadly the period between April 15, 1984 and April 15, 1985.
We are gratified by the report of the activities of the JWB Jew­
ish Book Council which reflects steady growth in the scope and
influence of its work. The section devoted to the 1985 National
Jewish Book Awards attests to the increased acclaim which has
come to Jewish authors and bookmen in as many as eleven fields
of literary endeavor.
On September 6, 1986, Rabbi Philip Goodman, who now lives
in Jerusalem, will mark his 75th birthday. We utilize this occasion
again to express our thanks to him for his many years of service
on behalf of the Jewish book. Rabbi Goodman served as execu­
tive secretary of theJWB Jewish Book Council from 1944 to 1975
and was a guiding spirit of the
Jewish Book Annual
and
Jewish
Bookland.
He is the author of
Illustrated Essays onJewish Bookplates
and editor of eight valuable anthologies.
We again express our profound appreciation to theJWB for its
role in sponsoring the activities and publications of the Council.
We are pleased to acknowledge the support of the Lucius N.
Littauer Foundation and the contributions o f the Joseph
Meyerhoff Fund, the Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Foundation, the
Irving and Bertha Neuman Foundation, the Morris J. and Betty
Kaplun Foundation, the Israel Matz Foundation and the I.
Edward Kiev Library Foundation. To Rabbis Robert Gordis, Gil­
bert Klaperman, and Ely E. Pilchik, former Council presidents,
our thanks for their continuing aid and encouragement.