Page 63 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 43

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LEIMAN/TORAH SCHOLARSHIP SINCE THE HOLOCAUST
51
granted that the medieval classics in all these areas have been and
will continue to be produced in better critical, and annotated edi­
tions as manuscripts are identified, collated, and published. In all
these areas, many hitherto unpublished medieval manuscripts
are appearing in print for the first time.
In the area of Prophets-Writings and Commentaries, the
D a ’at
mikra
series of commentaries on the Prophets-Writings, pub­
lished by Mosad ha-Rav Kook, Jerusalem, is clearly of major im­
portance for Torah scholarship. Thirteen volumes have ap­
peared since 1970. The commentaries represent a distillation of
all previous Jewish commentary in the light of modern archaeo­
logical discovery and philological advance. Geared for a popular
audience, the series is likely to become the major conduit for the
teaching of Bible from a Torah perspective. New
Midrashim,
of
course, are not being written. But new commentaries on the clas­
sic midrashic texts are commonplace since the Holocaust. Aside
from Kasher’s
Torah shelemah
mention should be made of Morde-
cai Margulies,
MicLrash Vayyikra Rabbah
(Jerusalem: 1953-1960, 5
vols.), and the Mosad ha-Rav Kook edition of
Midrash ha-gadol
(Jerusalem: 1947-1975, 5 vols.). Regarding
Mishnah and Tosefta
and Commentaries,
Saul Lieberman,
Tosefta ki-feshutah
(New York:
1955-1973, 13 vols.) is a model of the synthesis of
Jiidische
Wissenschaft
and Torah scholarship. Much more classically rab­
binic is Yeheskel Abramsky,
Tosefta hazon Yeheskel[2]
Jerusalem:
1971) a multi-volume commentary on the entire Tosefta, now ap­
pearing in its second edition.
Probably no area of Torah scholarship has received more at­
tention in recent years than
Talmud and Commentaries.
Among the
many outstanding works produced, special mention must be
made o f
Entsiklopedyah talmudit
(Jerusalem: 1947-1983, 17
volumes to date). It has been the most successful attempt ever to
synthesize all of talmudic halakhic teaching, and its aftermath, ac­
cording to topic. The commentaries that have appeared since the
Holocaust cover a wide range: from the masters of the abstract
analysis of talmudic principles, such as Yitshak Zeeb Soloveichik,
Hiddushei ha-GeRiZ al ha-Shas
(Jerusalem: 1972, 3 vols.), to those
noted more for their erudition than their profundity, such as
Reuben Margaliot,
Margaliyot ha-yam
(Jerusalem: 1958, 2 vols.),
and
Nitsotsei or
(Jerusalem: 1965), and Eliyahu Shulsinger,
Yad
Eliyahu
(Jerusalem: 1961-1979, 6 vols.), to those concerned pri­
marily with the relationship between Talmud and halakhah, such