Page 64 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 43

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52
JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
as Yitshak Arieli,
Einayim la-mishpat
(shorter version, Jerusalem:
1963-1966, 3 vols.), and
Einayim la-mishpat
(lengthy version, Tel
Aviv-Jerusalem, 1965-1976, 9 vols.). (We omit mention of
Avraham Yeshayahu Karelitz,
Hazon ish
— since virtually all the
volumes appeared in print prior to the Holocaust.) Among twen­
tieth century talmudic commentaries, especially noteworthy are
Shmuel Yitshak Hilman,
Or ha-yashar1^
(Jerusalem: 1977, 6 vols.),
Zeev Wolf Rabinowitz,
Sha’arei torat Erets Yisrael
(Jerusalem:
1940), and
Sha’arei torat Bavel
(Jerusalem: 1961). Both the afore­
mentioned scholars have contributed significant commentaries
to the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds. Reprints, as well as
new critical editions of the Rishonim (and the more famous
Aharonim) are commonplace and virtually best-sellers at the Jew­
ish bookstores.
In the realm of
Codes and Commentaries,
the monumental
Otsar
ha-poskim,
summarizing the responsa literature on
Shulhan
arukh: even ha-ezer
(Jerusalem: 1947-1972, 13 vols.) is perhaps the
single most important work. Similar series for the sections
Orah
hayyim
and
Hoshen mishpat
have been planned, and several
volumes have already appeared in print. Commentaries on all
the great codes of Jewish law continue to appear. Especially note­
worthy re g a rd in g M aimon ides’
Code
are such d isp a ra te
commentaries as Y.Z. Soloveichik,
Hiddushei Maran RYZ ha-Levi
(Jerusalem: 1973); Eleazar M. Shach,
A v i ezri
(Bnei Braq:
1964-1979, 5 vols.); and Hayim Kanievsky,
Kiryat melekh[3](
Bnei
Braq: 1983). A general trend in recent years has been toward
specialization, with entire monographs being devoted to specific
areas of halakhah. Typical of these are Yehiel M. Tuckatzinsky,
Gesher ha-hayyim[2]
(Jerusalem: 1960, 3 vols.); Nissen Telushkin,
Toharat mayyim[4]
(New York: 1976); and Yehoshua Y. Neuwirth,
Shemirat Shabbat ke-hilkhatah
(Jerusalem: 1965).
A burgeoning area of Torah scholarship is the
Responsa Litera­
ture.
No other area of Torah scholarship attests so vividly to the
continued vitality of the halakhah. The literature here is so vast
that it will suffice to merely mention the better-known authors:
Shelomoh Z. Auerbach (in a series of monographs and articles):
Mordecai Y. Breisch,
Helkat Ya’akov,
Gedalie Felder,
Yesodei
Yeshurun-,
Moshe Feinstein,
Iggerot Moshe;
Menashe Klein,
Mishneh halakhot;
Yitshak I. Liebes,
Beit a v i
; Moshe Stern,
Be’er
Moshe
; Eliezar J. Waldenberg,
Tsits Eliezer,
Shmuel Halevi