Page 322 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 44

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
Two devoted brothers decide to secretly bring each other gifts.
Legend has it that the Temple was built where they embraced in
the night as they met journeying to each other’s home. Florence
B. Freedman’s lyrical text, which utilizes the song:
Hinei mah tov
u ’mah naim shevet ahim gam yahad
(How good it is for brothers to
live together in friendship), and Robert Andrew Parker’s evoca­
tive paintings are in perfect harmony. They have provided a sen­
sitive treatment of a legend which has served for centuries as a
model for love, and introduced it to a whole new generation.
J
u d g e s
:
Sylvia Avner, librarian, 92nd Street YM-YWHA;
Susan Goodman, the Jewish Museum; Charles Mikolaycak, artist.
ISRAEL
M
orr is
J .
a n d
B
etty
K
a plun
M
emor ial
A
ward
The Other Arab-Israeli Conflict: Making America’s Middle East Policy
from Truman to Reagan,
by Steven L. Spiegel (University of
Chicago Press)
Spiegel’s careful scholarship, trenchant analysis, and readable
style have led to the choice of
The Other Arab-Israeli Conflict.
He
has crafted a book that helps one discern the shape and dynamics
of America’s Middle East policy in ways that no other book has so
far done. From the dark corridors of foggy bottom at the State
Department to the discussions in the White House and in Con­
gress, Spiegel illuminates what has become the most important
international relationship for the modern State of Israel.
J
u d g e s
:
Gary Rosenblatt, Baltimore Jewish Times; Dr. Samuel
Heilman, Queens College, CUNY; Dr. John Ruskay, Jewish The ­
ological Seminary.
JEW ISH HISTORY
G
errard
a n d
E
lla
B
erman
A
ward
Religious Conflict in Social Context: The Resurgence of OrthodoxJuda­
ism in Frankfurt Am Main, 1838-1877,
by Robert Liberies (Leo
Baeck Institute and the Greenwood Press)
In his excellent study of the period, Liberies presents a sophis­
ticated and elegant analysis of the interplay of religious, social,
and political forces in one of Germany’s most important Jewish
communities. He adds new dimensions to the study of Western
European Jewry in the Age of Emancipation and offers a fresh