Page 201 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 45

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WIENER /JEWISH LITERARY ANNIVERSARIES
1 9 3
unique is the publication o f the cataloging data, for many years on
printed cards, and more recently on tape. At present the listings are
in romanized form only, but hopefully in the not too distant future
they will be presented also in the original Hebrew alphabet.
M o r r i s L i c h t e n s t e i n .
50th anniversary o f death. Born near Memel,
Lithuania, in 1889, died in New York, November 6, 1938. In the
United States since 1907, he became a Reform rabbi, who eventually
founded the Society o f Jewish Science, a congregation patterned in
many ways after Christian Science. For many years that congrega­
tion flourished, and after his death, his wife became its spiritual
leader, probably the first woman rabbi in the United States. He pub­
lished several books setting forth his views, such as
Jewish Science and
Health
(1925),
Peace of Mind
(1927),
How To Live
(1929), and
The
Healing of the Soul
(1974), a translation from a Yiddish work first
published in 1934.
Herman (Chaim) Lieberman. 25th anniversary o f death. Born in Kolki,
Russia, in 1889 or 1890, died in New York, May 16, 1963. In the
United States since 1905, he was a Yiddish journalist, specializing in
literary criticism, not confined to Yiddish literature, but taking in
modern literature in general. While originally a Labor Zionist, he
became in later years Orthodox, changing his views on writers to
conform to his new ideology. Like many in the Jewish community he
was appalled by Sholem Asch’s preoccupation with Jesus, resulting
in his negative evaluation in
The Christianity of Sholem Asch
(1953).
The anti-Zionist American Council for Judaism he scored in
Stran­
gers to Glory
(1953). His views on American Judaism were expressed
in his collection of essays,
The Grave Concern
(1968).
L e v i b e n G e r s h o m .
700th anniversary of birth. Born in Bagnols-sur-
Ceze in 1288, died in 1344. A medieval Jewish philosopher, Bible
commentator, mathematician, and astronomer, he held unconven­
tional views, which exposed him to accusations of heresy on the part
o f the traditionalists. His major philosophic work,
The Wars of the
Lord,
has been translated in part in recent years, particularly those
sections, dealing with his understanding of God and that part on
astronomy
(The Astronomy of Levi ben Gerson,
1985). Of his Bible
commentaries,
The Commentary on the Book ofJob
appeared in English
translation in 1946.
L o u i s L ip s k y .
25th anniversary of death. Born in Rochester, N.Y., in
1876, died in New York, May 27, 1963. A pioneer in the Zionist
movement in America, he edited the first Zionist magazine,
The
Maccabean,
which later became
The New Palestine
and after 1948
The
American Zionist,
the official organ of the Zionist Organization of
America. From the beginning he attended Zionist congresses and
was active as leader also in the American Jewish Congress and the