Page 273 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 46

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LERMAN / AMERICAN JEW ISH FICTION BOOKS
2 6 5
Explores the very different lives o f two American Jewish cou­
ples.
L
a z a r r e
, J
a n e
.
The powers o f Charlotte.
Freedom, Calif.: Crossing Press,
1987. 316 p.
Orphaned Charlotte grows up in a political household o f Jewish
revolutionaries during the McCarthy era and begins a search for
her identity.
L
e i t n e r
, Y
e c h e s k e l
.
Operation: Torah rescue.
New York: Feldheim,
1987. 151 p.
A heroic journey o f Polish yeshiva students to Shanghai during
WWII.
L
e v i n
, J
e n i f e r
.
Shimoni’s Lover.
San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich,
1987. 378 p.
A moving story o f the effects o f war on Israeli soldiers and
their families as seen through the lives o f the Kol family o f Kibbutz
Mayan Ha-Emek.
L
i v i n g s t o n
, H
a r o l d
.
Ride a tiger.
New York: William Morrow, 1987.
611 p.
The life o f Jewish crime boss, Leo Gorodetsky, is portrayed from
his beginnings as a feisty kid on the Lower East Side to his later
years in organized crime.
M
a c
M
i l l a n
, I
a n
.
Proud monster.
Berkeley, Calif.; North Point Press,
1987. 140 p.
Seventy vignettes recreate the lives o f occupiers, occupied and
victims across the Eastern Front o f WWII.
M
o r r o w
, A
l e x a n d e r
.
Inside the sanctuary.
New York: Shengold Pub­
lishers, 1987. 258 p.
Hiding his Jewishness, Victor Suffern enters the prejudiced, cor­
porate life o f the 1940s until discovery turns management against
him.
P
r y c e
- J
o n e s
, D
a v i d
.
The afternoon sun.
New York: Weidenfeld &
Nicolson, 1987. 214 p.
This family saga begins in 19th century central Europe and
chronicles the Ellingen family’s rise in the London business world
through WWII.
R
o g a n
, B
a r b a r a
.
Cafe Nevo.
New York: Atheneum, 1987. 309 p.
Action revolves around Emmanuel Sternholz, a Holocaust sur­
vivor, who owns a seedy Tel-Aviv cafe, and his regular patrons
who work out their destinies there.
R
o i p h e
, A
n n e
R
i c h a r d s o n
.
Lovingkindness.
New York: Summit Books,
1987. 279 p.
Believing herself to be a sensible, modern woman, Annie John­
son cannot fathom how her daughter, who now belongs to an
extreme right-wing Orthodox Yeshiva in Israel, turned out wrong.