Page 299 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 47

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1989 National Jewish Book Awards
AUTOBIOGRAPHY
/
MEMOIR
T
h e
S
a n d r a
B
r a n d
a n d
A
r i k
W
e i n t r a u b
A
w a r d
,
presented
by Elenore Lester.
Fear No Evil,
by Natan Sharansky (Random House)
“A basic eternal truth was returning to the Jews of Russia
— that personal freedom wasn’t something you could achieve
through assimilation. It was available only by reclaiming your
historical roots.” These words from Sharansky’s
Fear No Evil
set the keynote to a book that is not only a powerful personal
memoir, but a reflection of an historic struggle for Jewish sur­
vival. Sharansky’s direct, unadorned account of his 15-year bat­
tle with a hostile society reveals a moral strength rooted in a
deep devotion to Zion. His keen intelligence and his humor
helped him stave off despair and overcome severe physical suf­
fering. Although countless efforts were made to destroy him,
he never lost his dignity or compromised his principles.
CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
A
n i t a
a n d
M
a r t i n
S
h a p o l s k y
A
w a r d
,
presented by Naomi
Kleinberg.
The Devil's Arithmetic,
by Jane Yolen (Viking Kestrel)
An original and well-written story,
The Devil’s Arithmetic
by
Jane Yolen is full of warmth, hope, and optimism, even as it
portrays the horrifying evil of the Holocaust. As a reluctant
participant at her godfather’s Seder, young Hannah plays her
traditional role and slowly opens the door to welcome the
prophet Elijah. Instead of seeing the familiar apartment hall,
she finds herself enveloped by the velvety night in the tight-knit
community of a Polish shtetl in 1942. After experiencing the
Nazi terror and the loving relationships that nourished the fam­
ily, the time-traveler returns understanding the reason behind
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