Page 302 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 47

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
Jewish immigrant experience in general, and to the understand­
ing o f American Jewry and its relationship to Zionism and Is­
rael, in particular.
JEWISH HISTORY
G
errard
and
E
lla
B
erman
A
ward
,
presented by Steven
Bayme.
Response to Modernity: A History of the Reform Movement in Judaism,
by Michael A. Meyer (Oxford University Press)
Michael Meyer’s history o f Reform Judaism in
Response to Mo­
dernity
provides a definitive synthesis o f the movement. He pre­
sents the subject in the broadest terms, not alone as liturgical
reform combined with religious ideology, but as a movement
which cannot be understood apart from its social roots and po­
litical context. The geographical limits are broadened to include
Eastern Europe, where the movement achieved limited success
and where its failure to expand further requires explanation,
and the intellectual borders are widened to provide necessary
comparison with more conservative religious responses to mo­
dernity. Finally, this volume pays special attention to the leading
figures in the movement whose personalities had a definite in­
fluence on the course o f Reform Judaism.
JEWISH THOUGHT
D
onor
A
nonymous
,
presented by Dr. Marc Gellman.
Commandments and Concerns: Jewish Religious Education in Secular
Society,
by Michael Rosenak (Jewish Publication Society)
Michael Rosenak has given us a pioneering work which, for
the first time, addresses in a philosophically and spiritually co­
herent manner the problems o f teaching children Judaism in
our secular, pluralistic age. The scope o f
Commandments and Con­
cerns
is exceptionally impressive. Rosenak speaks to the unique
religious and educational problems o f very different groups in
the Jewish world — from secular Zionists to Orthodox Jews
in the diaspora. He gently but firmly states his opinion that
without a foundation in faith, the teachings o f Judaism cannot
be taught or learned. In this book Rosenak has raised discussion
about Jewish education above matters o f mere pedagogic tech­
nique to the level o f faith and philosophy.