Page 89 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 47

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to Palestine, the Schocken family transferred the Schocken pub­
lishing enterprise to Tel-Aviv, also solidifying there the own­
ership of the respected Hebrew daily,
ha-Arets,
purchased in
1935.
Luah ha-Arets
(1941-54), sponsored by
ha-Arets,
inaugu­
rated the newspaper-sponsored literary annual in Palestine. A
veritable treasure-trove of Hebrew creative writing during the
Mandatory period and in the years following Israeli statehood,
a great deal of Agnon’s literary output is to be found in its
pages, including the first appearance of his short story, “Ido
ve-’Enam,” in the volume for 5711 (1950/51). A competing Is­
raeli annual,
Shenaton “Davar”
(Tel-Aviv, 1942-56) preserves in
the volume for 5714 (1953/54) poems by Leah Goldberg and
by Zalman Shazar (later the President of Israel); an article on
Israeli security and foreign policy concerns by David Ben-
Gurion; appreciations of Simone Weill by Samuel Hugo Berg-
mann and the Christian Hebraist and translator of the
Mishnah
into English, Herbert Danby, by Joseph Klausner; plus dozens
of stories and critical essays by the most widely read Israeli writ­
ers.
PALESTINE WORKS
Almanacs and literary annuals in Palestine have a long tra­
dition but only a few can be introduced here: Abraham Luncz’s
Luah, Erets-Yisra’el
(1895-1915) remains an important source of
Palestinography;
Sefer ha-Shanah shel Erets Yisra’el
(1923-26,
1934-35), founded by the Association of Hebrew Writers;
he-
Haver
(1924-31) and
Moladeti
(1936-68), directed at a popular
audience, but containing hard-to-find statistical data on the Jew­
ish community in the
Yishuv;
or
Areshet
(1944), an Orthodox
Jewish annual — part historical, part literary, part religious —
providing insights into the reactions of members of the Reli­
gious Writer’s Association to the decimation of European Jewry
then in full force.
“The almanac,” Ruth Wisse writes, “is both a proffered guide
to, and an interesting reflection of, its time. Undertaking to
assist in matters of immediate concern, it coaxes the buyer with
the twin promise of utility and entertainment. When its appeal
is confirmed by success, the almanac leaves behind it a record
SINGERMAN / ALMANACS AND LITERARY ANNUALS IN JEWISH LITERATURE
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