Page 208 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 48

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
he also wrote
The Jewish National Fund, Its History, Function, and
Activity (1932),
a work that appeared in several languages.
L
ouis
D.
B
randeis
. 50th anniversary o f death. Born in Louisville, Ken­
tucky, in 1856, died in Washington,
D.C.,
October 5, 1941. A
prominent lawyer in Boston and later the first Jewish supreme
court justice, he at first had little contact with organized Jewish
life. As a crusader for social justice he came into contact with So­
cialist Jewish immigrants and also learned o f their Zionist aspi­
rations. Thus, for the last 25 years o f his life he was active in
American Zionism, as evidenced in
Brandeis on Zionism
(1942,
1976), a collection o f his writings and addresses on that topic, as
well as in his
Letters
(1971-78), Volume 3: Progressive and Zionist.
N
ehemiah
B
rull
.
100th anniversary o f death. Born in Neu-Rausnitz,
Austria, in 1843, died in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, February
5, 1891. For a number of years he served as a liberal rabbi in
Frankfurt, where he clashed with Samson Raphael Hirsch, the
leader of neo-Orthodoxy. In his later years he devoted himself
to Jewish scholarship, editing a journal, being also its principal
contributor. His major interest was an analysis of the rabbinic clas­
sics, their origin and history. Before his death he undertook to
publish a Jewish bibliographic journal, of which, however, only
one volume appeared.
M
oses
B
ud inger
.
150th anniversary of death. Born in Mardorf, Ger­
many, in 1783, died in Cassel, Germany, January 30, 1841. For
many years he headed the Jewish teachers institute in Cassel. He
wrote several modern textbooks for Jewish religious schools that
were very popular in the German Jewish communities. The Uni­
versity of Marburg conferred a doctor’s degree upon him for these
efforts.
I
srael
C
h ipk in
.
100th anniversary of birth. Born in Vilnius, Lithuania,
March 31, 1891, died in New York in 1955. Coming to this country
as an infant, he became a prominent Jewish educator, serving for
many years as executive director of the Jewish Education Asso­
ciation of New York. He was instrumental in introducing modern
methods into Jewish education, as the immigrant generation was
replaced by a modern-oriented one. He served as editor of the
journal,
Jewish Education
and wrote
Twenty-Five Years of Jewish Ed­
ucation in the United States
(1937).
M
oshe
D
avis
.
75th birthday. Born in Brooklyn, New York, June 12,
1916. A graduate of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
he taught there for many years, also heading its Teachers Institute.
In recent decades he has been living in Jerusalem, teaching Amer­
ican Jewish studies at the Hebrew University. While in New York
he edited many conference publications sponsored by the Sem­