Page 211 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 48

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WIENER/JEWISH LITERARY ANNIVERSARIES
203
Illustrated Essays on Jewish Bookplates
(1971). In Israel he recently
published a history of his family.
H
einrich
G
raetz
.
100th anniversary of death. Born in Xions, Ger­
many, in 1817, died in Munich, Germany, September 7, 1891.
Originally a student of the neo-Orthodox leader, Samson Raphael
Hirsch, he parted company with him over biblical criticism. Ev­
entually he became a lecturer at the Breslau Jewish Theological
Seminary, teaching Bible and Jewish history. He is best remem­
bered for his multi-volume Jewish history which was one of the
major works offered to American Jewry in English translation by
the Jewish Publication Society (
History of the Jews,
1891-98). An
earlier work that had been published in Germany in the 1840s
appeared in English translation under the title,
The Structure of
Jewish History and Other Essays
(1975). Although conceiving of the
Jewish people as a nation rather than a religious community as
seen by the Reform Jews, he nonetheless shied away from the
early Zionist movement.
A
rthur
H
ertzberg
.
70th birthday. Born in Lubaszow, Poland, June
9, 1921. In this country since 1926, he was ordained at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America, becoming a prominent Conserv­
ative rabbi. For many years he officiated in Englewood, New Jer­
sey, and also taught Jewish history at Columbia University, trans­
ferring to the faculty of Dartmouth College after his retirement
from the rabbinate. A past president of the American Jewish Con­
gress, he has written widely in the field of modern Jewish history.
His anthology,
The Zionist Idea, a Historical Analysis and Reader
(1959, 1970, 1972), was widely acclaimed. In
The French Enlight­
enment and the Jews
(1968) he emphasized the negative attitude
of Voltaire toward Jews and Judaism. His most recent work,
The
Jews in America, a History
(1989), looks critically at the American
experience.
N
aphtali
H
erz
H
omberg
.
150th anniversary of death. Born in Lieben,
Czechoslovakia, in 1749, died in Prague August 23, 1841. One
of the most radical of the maskilim, he tried as a government-
appointed Jewish education officer to force modern ways of life
on the still traditionally oriented Jews of Galicia. In his textbooks
for children he propagated Austrian patriotism as a divine com­
mand of the Jewish religion. His activities tended to alienate most
of the people he tried to serve. He also wrote part of a commentary
on the Torah which was included in Moses Mendelssohn’s edition.
As official censor of Hebrew books, he advocated excision of pas­
sages that he regarded as anti-Christian.
D
aniel
J
ablonsk i
.
250th anniversary of death. Born in Danzig, Ger­
many, in 1660, died in Berlin, Germany, May 25, 1741. A Christian