Page 86 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 49

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JEWISH BOOK ANNUAL
the IFA number, the name and place o f origin o f the na rra to r,
and the main type and motif o f the story. Parallel versions o f
the story are also given. In addition the re are type-and-motif-
index tables and a bibliography at the end o f the collection.
Drawing from the oral tradition o f Morocco, Noy selected
71 stories from the IFA to publish in
Moroccan Jewish Folktales
(NY: Herzl Press, 1966). These tales, originally n a rra ted in
Judeo-Arabic and Judeo-Spanish , were later translated into He­
brew. Since the Jews o f Morocco lived side by side with people
o f ano the r faith, the theme o f intercommunal and in te rdenom ­
inational relations recurs th roughou t these stories.
In 1989, a new collection,
The Treasure of Our Fathers: Judeo-
Spanish Tales,
ed. by T am a r A lexander and Dov Noy, was pub ­
lished in Hebrew by Misgav Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Institute
for Research on the Sephardi and Oriental Jewish Heritage,
340 p.). T h e volume contains 101 Judeo-Spanish stories selected
from 1,410 Judeo-Spanish tales collected by the IFA. Most o f
the tales, never before published, are fairy tales with a clear
moral focus. T h e re are also complete motif and type indexes.
Dov Noy has most recently edited
Folktales of the
Beta-Israel9’
(Ethopian Jews)
(M. W urmbrand , trans., Lod: H aberm ann In ­
stitute for Literary Research, 1990). To date this volume ap ­
pears only in Hebrew.
POPULAR COLLECTIONS
Ausubel, Nathan.
A Treasury ofJewish Folklore: The Stories, Tra­
ditions, Legends, Humor, and Wisdom of the Jewish People.
New
York: Crown Publishers, 1990. 741 p.
I f there is bu t one volume tha t you can buy o f Jewish lore,
then this is the one recommended . Originally published in 1948,
it has gone th rough at least 24 printings, including a softcover
edition by Valentine. It is truly a treasury containing 750 stories
and 75 songs, and is back to take its rightful place as the “crown”
o f all the cu rren t collections. O f special value are Ausubel’s in­
troductions which synthesize his wide-ranging knowledge and
scholarship o f Jewish folklore and traditions in an en ter ta in ing
and readable style.
T h e introductions cover the six major divisions o f the book
and its many sub-divisions. Part Four,
Tales and Legends,
for
example, covers: 1. Biblical Sidelights; 2. T h e World to Come;