Page 207 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 50

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of the school, Rabbi Julius Eckman, who, in the Karp copy,
wrote in his own hand on the verso of the title page:
Compiled by the Editor o f the “Gleaner,” published at his re­
sponsibility and expense without any aid from the synagogue
[San Francisco’s Temple Emanuel] or its officers, which he hith­
erto sought in vain.
THE LAND OF ISRAEL AND AMERICAN ISRAEL
The American immigrant Jew’s ambivalent relationship to the
Holy Land is graphically shown in the illustration of a poem
in Hebrew, “Zion in America,” printed on a tipped-in foldout
found in most copies of Ralph B. Raphael’s Zionist tract,
Li-
She’elat Ha-Yehudim
(The Jewish Question), New York, 1893.
The Jewish immigrant, depicted as a wandering Jew, wanderer’s
staff in hand, is on his way to America — symbolized by the
newly erected Brooklyn Bridge. But his head is turned back­
ward; his gaze and his heart are toward Zion, depicted by an­
cient buildings and palm trees.
The collection is rich in American travels to the Holy Land
by Christian pilgrims, explorers and scholars. It is rich, too,
in manuscript and printed material on the Jewish encounter
with Eretz Yisrael, as the place for memories, aspirations and
philanthropy. We will limit ourselves to seven examples.
1.
The bond between the Holy Land and the Jews of America
was strengthened by a stream of
meshulahim,
emissaries who
came to collect funds, but who also served as religious and cul­
tural ambassadors to far-flung communities. One of the collec­
tion’s treasures is the record book of Joshua Zev Zissenwine-
Avner, a resident of Jerusalem who came to America in 1891
representing
Kolel
Suvalk and Lomza, the association of those
who had come from the two East European towns. His large
and beautiful record book contains a calligraphically inscribed
petition letter in Hebrew and Yiddish, signed by the members
of the
kolel,
and approved by the American consul in Jerusalem.
There is also a long, two-page agreement written by New York’s
Chief Rabbi Jacob Joseph, delineating the limitations placed
upon his solicitation activities, as well as a city-by-city, donor-
by-donor record of the enterprise, covering twelve cities be­
tween New York and Chicago.
K A R P /T H E KARP CO LLEC T ION OF AMERICAN JUDA ICA
199