Page 27 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 51

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SPERLING / ISRAELI BIBLICAL SCHOLARSHIP
19
DEVORAH DIMANT.
Dimant has a jo in t appo in tm en t in the
departm en ts o f Bible and Jewish History. Much o f h e r scholarly
work deals with how post-biblical writers such as the au thors
o f apocryphal and pseudepigraphical writings and the members
o f the Q um ran community made use o f “canonical” biblical lit­
e ra tu re . Dimant pays atten tion to compositional techniques and
advocates functional structura l analysis.
BENJAMIN KEDAR-KOPFSTEIN.
Most o f Kedar-Kopfstein’s
work is text-critical and philological, with a strong orientation
in linguistics. Kedar proceeds from philology to an appreciation
o f the in ternal conceptual world o f biblical thought. He has
written num erous articles for the
Theologisches Worterbuch zum
Alten Testament
(Berlin, 1970ff.). He is one o f the few Jewish
scholars who are involved in Vulgate studies.16Most o f his non-
Hebrew publications are in German. A major work o f Kedar-
Kopfstein’s is
Biblische Semantik
(Stuttgart, 1981).
MEIR MALUL.
Malul’s specific interest is in biblical and Mes­
opotam ian law. Two major publications in this area are his
Studies in Mesopotamian Legal Symbolism
(K eva lae r a n d
Neukirchen-Vluyn, 1988) and
The Comparative Method in Ancient
Near Eastern and Biblical Studies
(Kevelaer and Neukirchen-
Vluyn, 1990). In these researches he follows the anthropological
approach to law advocated by E.A. Hoebel in his
Law of Primitive
Man
(Cambridge, Mass., 1954). Ano ther aspect o f Malul’s work
is the exam ination o f biblical narrative to determ ine legal prac­
tices and notions. In this approach Malul follows the lead o f
the legal historian David Daube. Malul stresses tha t biblical n a r ­
rative offers the oppo rtun ity to the scholar to uncover the legal
world o f societal groups in ancient Israel. Such groups had d if­
feren t concerns and d iffe ren t locations in society from the leg­
islators who au tho red what later became the canonical legal
texts.
BARUCH MARGALIT.
In numerous articles over the years
Margalit has stressed the interconnections between biblical and
Ugaritic Studies. He characterizes some o f Ugaritic literature
as a “Canaanite Bible,” produced in the Galilee in the mid-
second millenium B.C.E. In his book,
The Ugaritic Poet ofAQHT;
16. See B. Kedar, “The Latin Translatons,” in J. Mulder (ed.),
Mikra
(Phil­
adelphia, 1988), 299-338.