Page 209 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 54

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201
Identity in Detective Fiction
a strong and interesting character, she conies up short in terms o f any
exploration o f her Jewishness
W
eiss
, M
ike
.
-
No Go OnJackson Street.
New York: Ballantine, 1987.
-
A ll Points Bulletin.
New York: Avon, 1989.
-A Dry and Thirsty Ground.
New York: St. Martin’s, 1992.
A San Francisco cab-driver turned sleuth (Ben Henry) is an intrigu­
ing character who wends his way through the city and in and out o f a
marriage, a career as a newspaper journalist and a few murders.
W
ilcox
, C
ollin
.
-
Bernhardt's
Edge. New York: Tor, 1988.
-
Silent Witness.
New York: Tor, 1990.
-
Exceptfor the Bones.
New York: Tor, 1991.
-
FindHer a Grave.
New York: Forge, 1993.
The private eye (Alan Bernhardt), also a director, actor, playwright
and widower, works at solving mysteries when he is not trying to direct
live theatre in San Francisco. And it is through the theatre that he
meets Paula, who eventually joins him as an associate in his investiga­
tions. The atmosphere is quite authentic, the detective’s angst is very
real, and the plots are finely developed.
Ac-cul-tu-ra-tion
n.
The mutual influence of different cultures in close
contact.
In this context, the Jewish characters in the following novels are inter­
ested in demonstrating some aspect of their religious, cultural, or ethnic
background which serves to illuminate the development o f the character,
or the plot.
B
rill
, T
oni
.
-
Date with a DeadDoctor.
New York: Worldwide Mystery, 1992.
-
Date with a Plummeting Publisher.
New York: Worldwide Mystery, 1995.
Reading these books allows you to be part of a family which includes
a divorced Jewish writer (Midge Cohen) who is fluent in Russian, lives
on Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn, and is frequently visited by her yenta,
widowed mother.
B
ergman
, A
ndrew
.
-
The Big Kiss-Offo f1944.
New York: Holt, 1974.
-
Hollywoodand Levine.
New York: Holt, 1975.
Before Bergman became successful with the screenplay for “Blazing