Page 339 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 54

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Wiener
331
G
a s t e r
, T
h eo d o r
H
e r z l
. 5th anniversary of death.
Born in London, England, July 21, 1906; died in Philadelphia, Pa.,
February 3, 1992. Professor. Author of many scholarly works on the
Bible, the ancient Near East, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and folklore.
G
e r s o n
- K
iw i
, E
d it h
( E
s t h e r
). 5th anniversary of death.
Bom in Berlin in 1908; died in Israel in 1992. Musicologist.
G o l d b e r g , B e n Z i o n
W .
25th anniversary of death.
Born in Olshani, Russia, January 9, 1894; died in Tel-Aviv, Decem­
ber 29, 1972. Journalist in English, Hebrew and Yiddish.
G o l d s c h m i d t , E r n s t D a n i e l .
50th anniversary
of
death.
Born in Koenigshuette (now Chorzow, Poland) in 1895; he died in
Israel in 1972. A librarian at the Prussian State Library from 1926 to
193 5, he was on the staff of the Jewish National and University Library
in Jrusalem from 1936 until 1962. He prepared critical editions of li­
turgical texts, including
selihot
,
kinot,
and the Ashkenazic
mahzor\
his
edition of the Passover Haggadah was translated in English and be­
came very popular.
G
o r d is
, R
o b e r t
. 5th anniversary of death.
Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., February 6, 1908; died in New York City,
January 3, 1992.Rabbi, scholar. Author of works on the Bible andJew­
ish thought.
G
o r d o n
, A
aron
D
a v id
. 75th anniversy of death.
Born in Troyanov, Russia in 1856; died in Degania, Eretz-Israel,
February 22, 1922. After settling in Eretz-Israel in 1904, he advocated
the return of the Jews to the soil in his Hebrew essays, exercising a pro­
found influence upon the Zionist labor movement.
GRODZINSKY, Z
e v i
H . 50th anniversary
o f
death.
Born in Lithuania ca. 1857; died in Omaha, Nebraska, December
30, 1947. Orthodox rabbi and author of several halakhic works.
G
u t t m a n n
, M
i c h a e l
.
125th anniversary of birth.
Bom in Felegyhaza, Hungary, February 6, 1872; died in Budapest
in 1942. He taught Talmud and Rabbinics at the Breslau and Budapest
rabbinical seminaries. In addition to many studies in Hungarian and
German, he began a talmudic dictionary in Hebrew, of which only the
first volume was published; the Nazis burned his papers before his
eyes.