Page 58 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 8 (1949-1950)

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J EW I S H BOOK A N N U A L
52
Another indication of a greater concern with Yiddish is the
publication of additional translations from the works of such
writers as Opatoshu, Pinski, Bergelson and others. The press
and radio also devote considerable space and time to Yiddish
literary events.
Noteworthy among the prose works is A. Reeves’
Iberjlantz
(Transplanted, Yiddish Literary Club) which deals with the
problems of the new transplanted immigrants. Reeves portrays
sharply the various nuances of the new life in Israel. Yiddish
poetry was enriched by a number of important contributions.
Abraham Sutzkever’s
Gehaymstot
(Secret City) is an important
poetic document of the destruction period. Sutzkever, a former
partisan, describes the experiences of a group of Jews in an
underground Vilna canal. Aryeh Shimri’s
In Toyer Fun Teg
(In the Gate of Days, Sifriat Poalim) offers a synthesis in sym-
bolic language of the themes of pioneering, struggle, readiness
for sacrifice and social problems.
Other poets who have issued collections during the past years
are J. Papirnikov, Nethanel Behiri, J. H. Belitzky and Z. Hersh-
man. Mention should also be made of Yitzhak Katzenelson’s
moving work,
Dos Lid Fun Oisgehargetn Yiddishn Folk
(The
Poem of the Murdered Jewish People, Hakibutz Hameuhad)
which was included in the edition of his last Hebrew writings.
In addition, various other titles appeared in such fields as
folklore and music. To meet the needs of the new immigrants,
new Hebrew-Yiddish textbooks were issued and anthologies
of translations from Hebrew literature were prepared.