Page 62 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 8 (1949-1950)

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J EW I S H BOOK A N N U A L
56
at fifty in 1944, is represented by a posthumous collection of
his breathtaking narratives —
Dertzeilungen
(Stories, Ma-
tones). Another posthumous publication is YKUF’s collection
of Leon Kobrin’s last novel and six short stories. A similar
service was rendered for B. Botwinick by his family. His stories,
largely of proletarian development in America —
Geklibene
Dertzeilungen
(Selected Tales) — were published in two large
volumes. In Los Angeles there appeared eight psychological
sketches by S. Miller under the title
Shtoib
(Dust). The Igna-
toff Fund is the publisher of Noah Goldberg’s
A Licht Geht Oif
(A Light Is Kindled), on Jewish-American farm life. Abra-
ham Bick’s
Moshe Hess
A Kronik
(Moses Hess — A Chron-
icle), on the great Zionist thinker of the last century, was put
out by YKUF. In Chicago, Solomon Levadi published his three
volume autobiographical novel,
Shvellen
(Thresholds). This
story of Jewish life in recent decades was beautifully illustrated
by the author as well. Saul Saphire, indefatigable writer of
historical romances, is represented by
Der Baal Teshuvah
(The
Repentant Sinner), set in the days of the Gaon of Vilna. A num-
ber of story collections are largely concerned with early days
in Europe and adaptation to the American scene: Solomon
Wasserman,
Heimishe Mentshen
(Home Folks); J. Freilich,
Viderklangen
(Echoes); Ben Gold,
Mentshen
(People);
N.
Segalovsky,
Der Oitzer
(The Treasure); Dr. Morris Levitt,
Tzeiten-Chvalyes
(Tides of Time); and Solomon Davidman,
Yiddishe Kinder in Biro-Bidjan
(Jewish Children in Biro-Bidjan).
Most of these latter works first appeared in the New York daily
Yiddish press.
The only play published in the one-time center of the Yiddish
drama was H. Leivick’s
Di Chassene in Fernwald
(Fernwald
Wedding), a somewhat mystical drama of the liberation of the
inmates of the German murder camps, and the efforts of its
erstwhile denizens to begin a new life.
An indication of the present rapid rapprochement between
Yiddish and Hebrew literature is the appearance of CYCO’s
Antologiefun der Hebreisher Poesye
(Anthology of Hebrew Verse),
critically edited by Mordecai Jaffe. This compilation, with
introductions to each author represented, extends over a thousand
years of writing to the present.
Another anthology in prose and verse is YKUF’s publication
of a Soviet volume of 1947 —
Of Neie Vegen
■—
Almanach fu n
Dreissik Yor Sovietish-Yiddish Shaffen
(On New Roads — Re-
capitulation of Thirty Years of Soviet-Yiddish Creativity).
Of its sixty-seven contributors, twenty perished in Soviet civil
or foreign wars, including the one against the Nazis. However,