Page 81 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 8 (1949-1950)

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G A L P E R T ---- MODERN H E B R EW L I T ERATURE
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Schneour, whose poems on Jewish historical subjects are among
the most majestic in modern Hebrew verse; Jacob Cohen, ex-
quisite romanticist; Bialik, Tchernichovsky, and others.
LEO W. SCHWARZS ANTHOLOGIES
Leo W. Schwarz’s three popular anthologies:
The Jewish
Caravan; A Golden Treasury of Jewish Literature
(New York,
Farrar and Rinehart, 1935 and 1937);
and Memoirs of My People
(Philadelphia, The Jewish Publication Society of America, 1943)
are also excellent sources of modern Hebrew expression. The first
volume contains, among others, selections by Micah Joseph
Berdichevsky, incisive thinker and essayist; Joseph Hayyim
Brenner, ill-fated Palestinian novelist and pioneer; Avigdor
Hameiri and Moses Stavsky, contemporary Israeli novelists and
short story writers; as well as by Bialik, Steinberg, Smilansky, and
Agnon.
A Golden Treasury of Jewish Literature
contains both prose and
poetry. Represented are such writers as Hayyim Hazaz, one of the
most magnificent of contemporary writers; Isaac Dob Berkowitz,
recognized for his healthy and refreshing realism; and, again,
Steinberg, Agnon, and Smilansky. There are also poems by David
Frishman, critic, poet, and translator; Rachel, a poetess of tender
and simple lyricism; Abraham Shlonsky, powerful modernist;
and Bialik, Tchernichovsky, Schneour, and several others.
Memoirs of My People
is a rather unique anthology in that it
contains the translations of some fifty-odd autobiographical
fragments, which unfold themselves into a panorama covering
a thousand years. Interesting and revealing self-portraits of Ahad
Ha’am; Bialik; Moses Smilansky; Mase, who was Crown Rabbi
of Moscow from 1893 to 1924; and Eliezer Ben Yehuda, the
pioneer of spoken Hebrew in modern times, are included.
While dealing with autobiographical material, mention should
be made, too, of Avraham Ben-Shalom’s
Deep Furrows
, translated
by Frances Burnce (New York, Hashomer Hatzair, 1937), which is
an autobiographical sketch of life in a cooperative farm settlement
in Palestine. A book containing records and writings of the pioneer
women of Palestine,
The Plough Woman
, by Rachel Katznelson-
Rubashov is also available in English, having been translated by
Maurice Samuel (New York, Nicholas L. Brown, 1932).
Returning now to anthologies, I. M. Lask, indefatigable trans-
lator, has compiled a number of short stories in a volume entitled
Palestine Stories
(Jerusalem, Tarshish Books, 1942). And still
another collection is that by Edmond Fleg,
The Jewish Anthology
(New York, Behrman House, 1925), which was translated by