Page 19 - Jewish Book Annual Volume 9 (1950-1951)

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AMERICAN JEWISH NON-FICTION BOOKS
1949-1950
By I.
E
d w a r d
K
i e v
T
HE output of non-fiction books about Jews and Jewish sub-
jects forms a very considerable proportion of the volumes of
Jewish interest published during the period covered by this annual.
This list of works published in English in the United States in-
eludes scholarly treatises, volumes of poetry and essays, memoirs
and letters, and English translations of Hebrew classics. A num-
ber of works on various aspects of biblical literature are also given
here. The books on Zionism, the State of Israel, educational text-
books, juveniles and fiction are given in another place in this
annual.
The number of scholarly volumes which were published during
the year is not at all negligible. Noticeable here are formidable
studies in Jewish history and sociology, some aspects of the phi-
losophy of Jewish education and a series of books on the growth
of prejudice and anti-Semitism. Most important for Bible stu-
dents was the publication of the volume of reproductions of the
manuscript of the Book of Isaiah and portions of the other scrolls
discovered near the Dead Sea in 1947. There were a number of
solid works on the influence of the Bible on English literature
and popular scholarly introductions to the study of the Bible by
Solomon Goldman and Solomon Freehof. Comparative studies of
ancient Near Eastern literature and law were presented in the
works by Theodor Gaster and Isaac Mendelsohn.
A significant segment of the scholarly studies was devoted to
Jewish history. Notable was Guido Kisch’s
The Jews in Medieval
Germany
, for which the author was awarded the Jewish Book
.Council’s annual prize for the best Jewish work of non-fiction.
This author also distinguished himself by publishing four scholarly
volumes in the course of the one year.
The two volumes on Jews and Judaism edited by Louis Finkel-
stein gave a summary of Jewish history and literature by a score
of authorities. Reform Jewish thought was treated in the book
edited by Bernard J. Bamberger and the volume of papers by
Julian Morgenstern.
American Jewish life was depicted interestingly in some out-
standing autobiographical works by Rebekah Kohut, Joseph M.
Proskauer, the late Stephen S. Wise, and others.
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